August 10, 2006

How to Make Perfect Corn on the Cob



Directions:
Wait until corn season. Bring 4 quarts of water to boil in a very large pot. Add 6-10 freshly shucked ears of corn. Cook uncovered 3-5 minutes until just tender. Remove from the water and eat immediately. Serve with lots of fresh butter.
My thoughts:
Making corn is a simple thing but it's easy to end up with tough corn. Look for the freshest corn available and stock up. Corn really starts to dry up once it's picked so produce stands (near farms) or the farmer's marker is your best bet. I like to buy a couple dozen ears, eat some and freeze the rest. Simply cut the kernels off the cob and deposit them in a freezer bag or air tight container. It will keep for months and tastes much better than commercially packed frozen or canned corn.

9 comments:

  1. I agree that fresh corn is the best, but I can't limit myself to a few weeks of the local season. That would mean no corn for Memorial Day and 4th of July BBQ's (I live in New York).

    I've had great fresh sweet corn in January, and it is always a nice reminder of summer in the dead of winter.

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  2. I agree that fresh corn is the best, but I can't limit myself to a few weeks of the local season. That would mean no corn for Memorial Day and 4th of July BBQ's (I live in New York).

    I've had great fresh sweet corn in January, and it is always a nice reminder of summer in the dead of winter.

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  3. still like mine roasted with butter. the caramelized corn is superb ....

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  4. Thanks for the hint on freezing corn! I was always wondering how to get "flavorful" corn all year-round but it never dawned on me how easy it is. YUM!

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  5. I love corn on the cob! When I get the water boiling, I also throw in some sugar...YUMMY!!! Gives the corn extra sweetness.

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  6. Actually, it tastes better roasted in the oven with the husks on for about 20 mins at 450 degrees...

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  7. I don't boil my corn, I just steam it for about 5 minutes--no salt. It tastes great!

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  8. Having worked with Extension Service years ago, I still have some old fashioned ideas. To freeze corn, blanch it in hot water, cut off the cob, package, then cover the corn in the package with a mixture of 1 cup sugar and 1/2-3/4 cup of salt to 1 gallon of water. The blanching stops the enzimes and the water mixture keeps it really fresh. I still have some from 2004 and it is still wonderful.

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  9. before freezing corn, whether on or off the cob, you need to blanch it. the enzymes, over time, break down and destroy, and change the color, flavor, and texture of food during freezing. of course, it takes more time, but well worth the much fresher taste.

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