June 27, 2008

Seasoned Potato Wedges



Ingredients:
1 1/2 lb red skin potatoes, cut into wedges*
olive oil

salt
black pepper
garlic powder
smoked paprika

Directions:
Bring a pot of water to boil. Drop in the potatoes, return to a boil and boil the potatoes for 3-5 minutes. You do not want to completely cook, you just want to get them started i.e. parboil the potatoes. Drain and pat dry. Drizzle with olive oil. Liberally sprinkle with spices. Place the wedges directly on the rack or in a grill pan over medium heat. Grill, turning occasionally, until cooked through, about 10-15 minutes.





*If you don't have a grill pan, make sure the wedges are large enough not to fall through the grate.


No grill?
Place the wedges on a baking sheet and bake for 20 minutes, tossing occasionally, in a preheated 375 degree oven.


My thoughts:

my grill friday

The worse part about grilling is deciding what to make as a side dish. No one really wants to spend their time running back and forth between the kitchen and the grill. To avoid that you either have to make something to serve with the main dish in advance that can be refrigerated (think macaroni salad, potato salad, deviled eggs, vegetables and dip) or, and this is my favorite solution, make the side dish on the grill. On a recent night we were grilling hamburgers and what goes better with hamburgers than fries? Traditional thin cut fries would burn on the grill but wedges are just right-thick enough to stand up the heat and stay crisp, but small enough to cook quickly. The brief pre-cooking session ensures that the potatoes will cook thoroughly on the grill and end up with a crisp exterior and a fluffy interior.

Quick note:
While I am generally not a fan of garlic powder (why use it when the real thing is so much better?) it is perfect here adding just a hint of garlic flavor to the wedges and it doesn't burn like fresh garlic would in this situation.

11 comments:

  1. I do have a question - do you think you could parboil the potatoes and then refrigerate them until you're ready to grill them? Thanks!

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  2. Carole Knits:
    I guess you could, but you'd have to let them come to room temperature before grilling so there are no cold centers that don't cook.

    I think it would take them longer to come to room temperature than it would to parboil them. But if you were taking them some where else to grill, that might not be an issue.

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  3. Cool idea. I love to grill, and I should try that sometime.

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  4. Love potatoes on the grill. I like to cut them in thick slices instead of wedges so they're less likely to fall through the grill (plus, more surface area to crisp up!).

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  5. Dan- you didn't find that they dried out in thick slices? I found that wedges got very crispy but also stayed moist and fluffy inside, while slices got a little dried out if you let them cook even a minute too long.

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  6. I've been wanting to do some potatoes on the grill for weeks now.

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  7. This looks awesome. I made yam wedges in a similar way, and made a warm miso dip (miso, water, cornstarch)to go along and it's really tasty!

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  8. Gaurav recommended this one - looks yum:)

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  9. Hi Rachel, I too avoid buying all these seasoned powders, if possible.As I am in the Tropics(meaning HOT) I sun dry thin slices of peeled garlic for a couple of days, crush to a powder, and add to any dish or salt that calls for it. Trying onions now, seem to be drying well! tks for sharing all these lovely recipes,
    regards, Mrs Singh from Malaysia

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  10. I am gravitating to these delicious looking wedges since potatoes are verboten on the South Beach Diet, but if I could have them,your wedges would be at the top of my list!

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