January 09, 2012

Reubens


Ingredients:
1 lb sliced corned beef
4 slices Swiss Cheese
8 slices rye bread (or rye and pumpernickel swirl)
1 cup sauerkraut, at room temperature or slightly warmed
butter

Russian dressing:
2 slices dill pickle, minced
1 shallot, minced
3 tablespoons mayonnaise
3 tablespoons sour cream
1/2 tablespoon prepared horseradish
2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
white pepper


Directions:
Stir together the dressing ingredients. Spread on 4 slices of bread. Top each with a layer of corned beef then sauerkraut then Swiss. Top with the remaining slices of bread. Melt the butter in a skillet and cook each side until golden brown, covering briefly if needed to warm the sandwich through. Slice and serve.


My thoughts:
I included this on the menu of our 1930s extravaganza despite the sandwiches origins being in some bit of dispute. However, the first verified mention of a Reuben sandwich on a menu dates from 1937 so that is good enough for me! I like homemade ones (and the variation of using the rye/pumpernickel swirl bread) much better then too greasy ones one often encounters at a deli or sandwich shop. Taking a moment to warm the sauerkraut or let it come to room temperature helps the sandwich heat all the way through.

3 comments:

  1. I love the presentation of this with the swirling bread!! I've not made a reuben in awhile - mostly around St. Patty's day, but you've now have me craving one!!

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  2. Great photo.... I love a good reuben and will certainly try this one....

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  3. When I make reubens I always preheat the corned beef and sauerkraut before assembling the sandwich. Never have to worry about the center not being hot or burning the outside to get it hot. It has been quite a while since I've had a reuben, I am now craving one... ;)

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