April 05, 2013

Jam Filled Buttermilk Sweet Rolls with Jam-Cream Cheese Frosting




Ingredients:

for the dough:
4 cups flour
1/2 oz yeast
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup butter, sliced
1 cup buttermilk
1/2 teaspoon vanilla paste
1 egg, at room temperature
1 teaspoon salt

roll filling:
4-6 oz jam (I used raspberry-plum jam)

frosting:
3 ounces cream cheese, softened
3 tablespoons butter, softened
1 1/2 cups confectioners' sugar
1 tablespoon jam (I used raspberry-plum jam)
1/8 teaspoon salt


Directions:

In a small saucepan, warm butter and buttermilk to about 120°. Pour into a large mixing bowl, add yeast. Let sit. Slowly add the sugar, vanilla paste and the egg. Add salt and 2 cups of flour on low, mix until smooth. Slowly mix in the remaining 2 cups of flour. The mixture should become a sticky dough at this time. Scrape out the dough onto floured counter top. Knead dough until it doesn't stick to your hands, adding small amounts of flour (up to 1/2 cup) as needed.


Place in a greased bowl. Cover with a tea towel and let rise for about 45 minutes or until it doubles in size. Remove dough from bowl and place on a floured counter. Roll out in a 12 by 24 inch rectangle. The dough should be about 3/4 inch thick. Spread jam in a thin layer over the dough. Roll dough from the short side in into a tight log. Cut into 1 inch thick slices. Place in 2 lightly greased 9 inch round cake pans, forming a circle with one roll in the middle. Preheat oven to 350. Allow to rise about 1/2 hour until they are about level to the top of the cake pan. Bake for about 15 minutes, then test for doneness. Pay careful attention to the creases where the rolls touch each other. Remove to a wire rack or invert on a plate. Whisk together the icing ingredients. Ice while the rolls are slightly warm. Store leftovers in an air-tight container.





My thoughts:
It is that time of year when a canner's thoughts turn to using up all of the jam, pickles, fruit ketchup, butter and barbecue sauce they made last year before canning season hits in full swing. Luckily in Maryland our stone fruit and berry season isn't in full swing for quite a few months so I have to time to clean out my canning cabinet. I've had the idea for a fruity sweet roll for a while now but I had been thinking of it as a way to use fresh fruit. Then I looked at all the jam I have and thought why not try it with jam. I might still make a fresh fruit version when the time comes but I'm over the moon about how these rolls turned out. If you are not a canner, you can, of course, use purchased jam but for best results it needs to be on the thick side. Of course, you also want it to be full of fresh fruit flavor which really shines in these rolls. The dough, made with tart buttermilk, isn't overly sweet as to provide a foil for the icing and jam filling. I don't want to give anyone a toothache! It really is a fun, sweet, fruity alternative to the more traditional cinnamon roll.

6 comments:

  1. Looks yummy! Do you think I could substitute lemon curd for the jam in this recipe?

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    Replies
    1. I don't see why not! It is worth a try anyway. Let me know how it turns out.

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  2. Sounds really good! I would love raspberry or cherry :)

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  3. Hi Rachael!

    I guess this first step is known as proofing the yeast?

    I've made lots of yeast breads using my stand mixer, with regular or rapid rise yeast, but never encountered this step before.

    So, how long does your recipe need to sit before you add the sugar, etc.?

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    Replies
    1. I just let it sit as long as it takes me to measure out the other ingredients! So not long. It just dissolves the yeast a little bit so it mixes in more easily.

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  4. saw your post on our Southern Food Bloggers FB group. YUM girl, this is great. Pinning and plan to make in the morning.

    ReplyDelete

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