Showing posts with label latkes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label latkes. Show all posts

November 14, 2013

Zippy Corn Latkes


Ingredients:
2 11-oz cans Green Giant Steam Crisp Extra Sweet Niblets®, drained
2 eggs
1/4 teaspoon paprika
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup flour
1/4 cup canola oil


Directions:
Place half of the corn and eggs in a blender and pulse until smooth. Pour into a medium bowl. Stir in remaining corn and spices. Whisk in flour.

Heat the oil in a large skillet. Drop 1/4 cups of the corn mixture into the oil. Cook 2-3 minutes on each side or until golden brown. Drain on paper towel-lined plates and serve immediately.



My thoughts:

One of the best things about Hanukkah is the excuse to fry things. I love making latkes each year and since Thanksgiving and Hanukkah are intersecting for the last time for 70,000 or so years, I thought I'd combine a Thanksgiving side dish favorite, corn, with latkes. Corn isn't in season now so I used Green Giant Steam Crisp corn. It is vacuum packed and has very little extra liquid, making it perfect for frying. These latkes are similar to Southern corn fritters but crispier, flatter and I used pureed corn instead of dairy so they are perfect for your Hanukkah table. The combination of the pureed corn and the whole corn (which pops in your mouth when you bite in) results in the corn-iest tasting corn latke you can imagine. If dairy isn't a concern, they are great with sour cream or try a bit of Israeli date syrup.


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December 12, 2012

Potato-Rutabaga Horseradish Latkes


Ingredients:
4 cups grated Russet potatoes
1 1/2 cups grated rutabaga
1 medium onion, grated
2 eggs, beaten
1/4 cup matzo meal
1 1/2 tablespoons prepared horseradish
sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
canola oil
Directions:

In a large cast iron skillet or other heavy bottomed pan, heat about 1/4 inch oil.

In a large bowl, combine the eggs, spices, horseradish and the matzo meal. Add potato, rutabaga and onion. Toss to combine. Form into flat patties. Fry in hot oil, flipping half way through, until just golden. Drain on paper towel lined plates.
Yield: about a dozen latkes, depending on size.

My thoughts:
You have to love a holiday that encourages the making and eating of fried foods. So yesterday we lit the candles, turned on the stove and fried up some latkes. The last few Hanukkahs I've pulled out the mandolin to shred the potatoes but this year I went old school and used the box grater. It really works well. If your potatoes weep a lot, drain them and pat them dry before frying.

Rutabaga naturally shreds finely and was easy to evenly distribute in the potato mixture. It also adds a bit of crunch and a peppery taste. I love horseradish so I threw some of that in too. It gave some zip without being overpowering. We enjoyed them with sour cream.

December 14, 2009

Smoked Salmon & Green Onion Latkes


Ingredients:
2 1/2 lbs Russet potatoes, grated
1 medium onion, grated
2 eggs, beaten
3/4 cup minced smoked salmon (lox)
1/4 cup matzo meal
1/4 cup finely minced green onion (green parts only)

canola oil

Directions:
In a large pan, heat about 1/4 inch oil. In a large bowl, toss all of the igredients together to combine.



Form into flat patties. Fry in hot oil, flipping half way through, until just golden.



Drain on paper towel lined plates.

Yield: about a dozen latkes, depending on size.

My thoughts:
I love latkes. What is there not to love about a crispy, fried potato? Making them the exact same way year after year can be a bit boring however. This year I decided to add one of my absolute favorite foods, smoked salmon, to my latkes. I wasn't quite sure how it would turn out but after a test latke was a rousing success, I made a whole batch. Crispy potato + freshness from the green onion + smoky flavor from the salmon = best latkes ever. They are exceptionally good when eaten with sour cream, which really brings out the flavor of the smoked salmon.

A quick note about methods:
For this year's latkes I once again used my mandoline which made great, long, thin strips that cooked quickly and gave off very little liquid. That said, you don't need a mandoline to make great latkes, a box grater works fine. I don't recommend (as some do) using a food processor to grate the potatoes, it breaks down the starches and gives the latkes a gluey consistency.

December 26, 2008

Potato-Carrot Latkes


Ingredients:
2 1/2 lbs Russet potatoes, grated
2 large carrots, grated
1 large onion, grated
2 eggs, beaten
1/4 cup matzo meal
canola oil


Directions:
In a large pan, heat about 1/4 inch oil. In a large bowl, combine the eggs and the matzo meal. Add potatoes, carrots and onion. Toss to combine.

rawlatke2

Form into flat patties. Fry in hot oil, flipping half way through, until just golden. Drain on paper towel lined plates.

Yield: about a dozen latkes, depending on size.

My thoughts:
For this year's latkes I was excited to try out my new mandoline which made great, long, thin strips of the potato, carrot and onion much faster than traditional grating. I also thought that the latkes cooked through a little better than when I've grated potatoes with a box grater; none of the latkes had even the slightest bit of raw potato, something I've occasionally encountered in these types of potato latkes. That said, you don't need a mandoline to make great latkes, a box (or other) grater works fine. A lot of people use a food processor to shred the potato but I personally think it chops the potato up a bit too much and the latkes sometimes become a little gluey as a result.

This Hanukkah I added carrot to the potato and really enjoyed it. It wasn't much of a change texture-wise but it added a bit of sweetness to the potato. Plus it is always a good idea to sneak in a little extra vegetables on a holiday devoted to fried foods. Latkes are rather time consuming and I know we rarely bother to make another side dish when we have them.

December 19, 2006

Eggplant Latkes



Ingredients:
1 medium eggplant, peeled and grated
1 small onion, minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
3/4 cup matzo meal*
1 tablespoon corn starch
1 egg
1/2 teaspoon paprika
salt and pepper to taste
A nonstick frying pan with 1/2 inch of vegetable oil

Directions:

Heat the oil in the frying pan on a medium high heat. Mix eggplant, onion, garlic, matzo meal, corn starch, egg, paprika, salt and pepper in a bowl and let stand for 10-15 minutes while the oil gets hot (test by placing a small portion of the batter in the oil - it should sizzle). Scoop 1/2 cup of the batter, shape into patties, and fry for 2-3 minutes on each side until it is golden brown. Drain on paper towel lined plates. Serve hot with sour cream or applesauce.
Yeild: about 9 latke.

*Matzo meal is made from ground matzo, a flat, unleavened bread. You could substitute bread or cracker crumbs.
My thoughts:
Last night was the 4th day of Hanukkah and to celebrate, we made these latkes. It is traditional to make fried foods at Hanukkah to commemorate the miracle of the oil: basically, oil was needed to light the menorah at the temple, there was only enough oil to burn for one day, yet miraculously, it burned for eight days. Latkes are generally made with potato and are sometimes referred to as potato pancakes but this year we wanted to try something slightly nontraditional. I loved them, good flavor, easy to make.

December 09, 2004

Latkes




Ingredients:
2 lbs potatoes, grated
1 large onion, grated
2 eggs, beaten
2 tablespoons matzo meal
olive oil
Directions:
In a large pan, heat oil. In a large bowl, combine the eggs and the matzo meal. Add potatoes and onion and combine. Fry in hot oil, flipping half way through, until just golden then drain and serve with sour cream. Yum.

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